What aspects of vision are trainable?

We use Vision Therapy to address the following conditions and enhance the following visual skills:

Amblyopia:  Amblyopia is a developmental neurological condition where visual acuity is impaired.  During the time when the eyes and brain are still developing together (usually considered between birth and seven years of age) a clear image needs to be transmitted to the brain from each eye…

ConvergenceObjects that are far, far away from our eyes do not require any convergence, or “crossing-in.”  For these distances, both of our eyes are basically pointed straight ahead and in parallel…

Depth PerceptionHumans use many clues to determine where we are and where other objects are in space, often to a very precise degree…

FocusingJust like a camera’s autofocus our own eyes can bring things into clear focus, no matter how close or far the object is from our eyes…

HyperopiaWith hyperopia, the closer an object is to the eye the more difficult it is for the eye to maintain clear focus.  Because the eye is excessively short, light comes to a focus “after” it hits the retina causing a blurry image…

MyopiaWith myopia, objects that are further away appear blurrier than things that are closer to your eyes.  This is most often caused by the lengthening of the eyeball, however an increase in the curvature of the front surface of the eye (the cornea) can have the same effect…

Peripheral VisionAlthough vision is commonly thought of in terms of central vision (foveal vision) which gives us the fine detail of objects and color, our peripheral vision is vitally important to all of our day to day activities.  Our sense of balance, performance in sports, ability to read, as well as just walking around without bumping into things would be much more challenging or impossible without good peripheral vision…

StrabismusA Strabismus occurs when a person’s eyes do not align properly.  Sometimes this is very apparent cosmetically (as in wall-eyes or crossed eyes) or it may only be picked up during a comprehensive eye exam…

TrackingVision can be thought of as a series of snapshots, the brain takes hundreds such pictures every second.  The eyes are constantly moving to feed this visual information to the brain.  The way in which we describe the major types of eye movements are fixations, pursuits, and saccades…

Visual AcuityVisual acuity is quite simply the ability to see the finest details of an object, whether it is a tree on a far-away mountain or the intricate pattern of a butterfly’s wing.  The most common way we speak of visual acuity though says nothing about our visual performance up close…

Visual AttentionVisual attention is the ability to literally keep the eyes tracking and focused on a particular task in the face of many other sensory distractions.  This process is of course aided by providing both eyes the best-corrected vision and the clearest focused image possible…